My Coaching Philosophy and Approach

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I am convinced that:

  1. Each and every one of us has potential and creative energy to be who we really are and have been destined to be.
  2. We all have a purpose and we can attain it when we identify, and tap into, our own potential.
  3. Change is constant; we need to give ourselves the courage to be resilient and to manage change.
  4. Self-awareness is a necessary prelude to change.
  5. Leadership is a way of being – not only of doing. It requires authenticity, self-awareness and responsibility. It requires reflection, not only action.
  6. Leaders need to have a profound systemic understanding of their teams, their organization, and of the world.
  7. Leadership requires combinations, of intellect and emotion, of wisdom and compassion. When wisdom and compassion go hand in hand, many good things can happen.

As a coach I help people use their potential and their talents, to live a conscious life with meaning, personal goals, and joy.

I love Socrates’ comment that, “I cannot teach anyone”, and I readily agree that the only thing I can contribute as coach & facilitator is to help clients in their quest for learning of self and transformation.

I understand that the coach – client relation is founded on mutual trust and openness; it is based on living here and now, on attentiveness and sincerity.

My coaching style is situational and client centric. It varies between non-directional and co-creational depending on the situation at hand. I strengthen the client’s sensitivity to self-discovery and awareness with empathic and open, non-judgmental listening; this helps clients discover their own solutions. I sometimes use examples from my own experience in business.

My coaching approach is eclectic: I tap into various sources of inspiration. To name the most common: Systemic theory, Humanistic psychology (Client Centered Approach – Carl Rogers), Transpersonal psychology, Positive psychology, Gestalt psychology, Transactional Analysis, Experiential Learning, and N.L.P.

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